First Saturday | August 2016: Photos by Dan Fleming | Launchpad
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First Saturday | August 2016: Photos by Dan Fleming

First Saturday | August 2016: Photos by Dan Fleming

Join us on Saturday, August 6th from 7 p.m. – 9 p.m. at Central Gallery for our latest First Saturday Art Opening featuring the photography of Dan Fleming.

Dan Fleming is not a professional photographer. He is an Outreach Worker for the Shaw House, a local youth homeless shelter covering five counties. His work exposes the stories of the youth he works with on a daily basis. This exhibit will be available for viewing at Central Gallery for the month of August 2016.

There is a $5 suggested donation. Craft beer provided by Orono Brewing Company (must provide valid ID)

Artist Statement

I am not a photographer. What I am is an Outreach Worker for the Shaw House, a local youth homeless shelter covering five counties. As a member of that team, it is my job to identify and connect with community ``at-risk`` youth and help them meet their needs to further successful independence. I engage them in their own environment, where they feel most comfortable, and often in the places they unfortunately call home. We all have preconceived notions of what homelessness looks like due to its portrayal in the media. Yes, there are often layers of clothing, park benches, shopping carts, and other traits that are so common they've become shorthand for the homeless. But there is more, especially when it comes to the youth. There are places that exist in this city where these throwaway kids go to find one another, to find a place where they belong, to be accepted by someone, anyone. Often these are not safe places. The campsites, abandoned houses, and bridge underpasses can offer them many things, but a home shouldn't be one of them. They are forced to make choices that we never have to make, that we can barely comprehend, that we wouldn’t wish on anyone. They have stories that will break even the hardest of hearts, especially when you are reminded that they are children, children that live in our community, children that we pass every day. This is your chance to imagine their stories, to make the choices they have to make. As you do so, try to remember the overused analogy about walking a mile in someone else’s shoes. Then imagine having to live in them. Thank you.
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